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Las Vegas could benefit from high-tech thermal cameras to spot, track potential COVID-19 cases

These are screen shots from a video provided by kogniz, a Silicon Valley company which says they have technology to help track potential COVID-19 cases.
These are screen shots from a video provided by kogniz, a Silicon Valley company which says they have technology to help track potential COVID-19 cases.
These are screen shots from a video provided by kogniz, a Silicon Valley company which says they have technology to help track potential COVID-19 cases.
These are screen shots from a video provided by kogniz, a Silicon Valley company which says they have technology to help track potential COVID-19 cases.
Posted at 8:16 PM, Sep 15, 2020
and last updated 2020-09-16 02:30:27-04

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — A Silicon Valley company says they have some new technology that can help reopen businesses shuttered by COVID-19 and better track people showing one of the symptoms of the deadly virus.

Daniel Putterman, CEO of Kogniz, says the company has developed a technology system with high-tech cameras to watch for fever, one of the symptoms of COVID-19 and other illnesses.

"The idea is, things aren't going to be normal probably ever again, but we need to start feeling like things are normal, and one of the things we can do is start getting people in buildings, not these single files, making sure they're wearing masks, and doing it all with [artificial intelligence.]" said Putterman.

Putterman says the cameras use both thermal and optical technology which can help in contract tracing and is so sophisticated the system can detect when a person is not wearing a mask.

"Here's a secret about thermal technology, you can state the accuracy of the thermal technology, it's irrelevant because the environment, the heat and the cool will affect your skin temperature by up to 7 degrees Fahrenheit, so honestly, most temperature screenings that are being done today are being done incorrectly, and people are getting incorrect measurements all day long," explained Putterman.

CORONAVIRUS: Confirmed cases in Clark County, what's happening around the state

The system is designed to be discrete and not intrusive.

But it does raise questions about privacy and protected health information.

"When it's under the guise of public health, a public health screening may be able to overstep those boundaries, but there are a lot of concerns that people have about privacy issues because if someone is hot flashing, or had a higher temperature, they want that privacy," explained Dr. Daliah Wachs, a physician and radio show host.

Putterman says the cameras can be used at venues like hotels and casinos to help staff locate those who may have a fever, and a step that could help businesses open or events restart under the new normal.

Putterman indicates his company is getting inquires from larger companies and airports to incorporate the technology.

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