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Winter visitors at Mount Charleston, surrounding area leave behind 12 tons of trash in 2019

A non-profit group is trying to get the word out to help keep Mt. Charleston and the surrounding area clean after capacity crowds packing popular sledding areas, with more expected this weekend
A non-profit group is trying to get the word out to help keep Mt. Charleston and the surrounding area clean after capacity crowds packing popular sledding areas, with more expected this weekend
A non-profit group is trying to get the word out to help keep Mt. Charleston and the surrounding area clean after capacity crowds packing popular sledding areas, with more expected this weekend
A non-profit group is trying to get the word out to help keep Mt. Charleston and the surrounding area clean after capacity crowds packing popular sledding areas, with more expected this weekend
Posted at 10:14 PM, Jan 02, 2020
and last updated 2020-01-03 02:16:22-05

LEE CANYON (KTNV) — The winter weather has led to capacity crowds for Mount Charleston and the surrounding areas, and if previous years are any guide, there will be literally tons of trash left behind.

The Southern Nevada Conservancy says the trash trouble left behind by winter visitors is a perennial problem.

"Unfortunately in the winter, with these heavy crowds, there's tons of garbage coming up that is pretty much staying up here," said Amanda Tumbleson with the Southern Nevada Conservancy.

"[It's] staying on the side of the roads and staying in the recreational sites."

The nonprofit group partners with the U.S. Forest Service to help preserve and protect the public lands and keep them clean.

"[What] it comes down to, for us, is we want people to come up here and have fun and play in the snow, enjoy the public lands," added Tumbleson. "We also really want them to be safe and keep these habitats safe."

in 2019, Tumbleson says 1,000 volunteers helped to collect 24,000 pounds, or 12 tons, of garbage left behind on the mountain.

She says they collected everything from diapers, to broken sleds and micro trash.

"You should throw it in the garbage can because no one wants to see that while they're having fun," said Erin Giunta, a Lee Canyon visitor.

The Southern Nevada Conservancy has taken action through education and is reminding people to be responsible and to take the trash they create with them, or use the provided waste receptacles.

The organization is planning a spring cleaning when the snow melts. Details will be announced on their website, which can be found here.

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