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UPDATE: New federal help coming to Las Vegas for New Year's Eve

Certain items banned on Strip
Posted at 5:51 PM, Dec 27, 2016

New Year's Eve on the Las Vegas Strip is the highest priority it has ever been this year for the Department of Homeland Security.

In a press conference Thursday, Las Vegas police said the celebrations have been bumped up to Special Event Assessment Rating Two. The only level higher is one, for things like the Super Bowl.
 
This means there will be extra federal special agents and officers on the Strip helping police.
 
City leaders say there are no specific or credible threats to Las Vegas for New Year's Eve.

RELATED: 2017 New Year's Events Around Las Vegas

More security has been noticed on valley roads with signs implying "See Something. Say Something."

It is not unusual to see these signs up when there are big events that amass a large number of people. They are there to serve as a reminder to be vigilant.

The National Guard will also have its eye on McCarran International Airport. A team of 40 uniformed soldiers will join local police at the airport from Dec. 30 through Jan. 2.

They say it's not due to any specific threat, but they want to be prepared if there is an emergency.

The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority is expecting 320,000 visitors over the New Year's weekend -- about 1,000 more than last year. All visitors are expected to spend $215 million, the same as last year.

Meanwhile, Las Vegas police reminded locals and visitors alike that Clark County ordinance is now in effect, banning backpacks, large bags, strollers, luggage, coolers, etc., during New Year's Eve festivities on the Las Vegas Strip.

Las Vegas police are also using a new smartphone app called Secure Communications to communicate on New Year's Eve. They say it's faster and more secure because it encrypts text messages and works like a giant group text.

In the past, officers used radios to talk but they had a hard time hearing them in large crowds.

Las Vegas police also used this app during the presidential debate at UNLV in October.