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Vegas History: Monday marks 16 years since Stardust casino's main towers imploded

Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Stardust implosion: March 13, 2007
Posted at 12:53 PM, Mar 13, 2023

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — Monday marks 16 years since the iconic Stardust casino imploded, and 2023 would have marked 65 years since the resort first opened.

Construction on the casino began in 1955 and the Stardust opened on July 2, 1958. At the time, it had more than 1,000 hotel rooms and was the biggest hotel in Las Vegas.

The casino was also known for its show "Lido De Paris," which was the first topless French revue production in Las Vegas. Boyd Gaming bought the Stardust in 1985 and eventually got rid of the show. Instead, magicians Siegfried and Roy took the stage with their show "Enter the Night" in 1992.

Watch: Locals react to the Stardust implosion on March 13, 2007:

Stardust implosion for web 2

Boyd closed the Stardust in 2006 and the casino was imploded on March 13, 2007. Boyd sold the Stardust site to the Malaysian company Genting Group in 2013, and the property was eventually developed into Resorts World.

Parts of the casino still live on across the valley.

Resorts World pays homage to its predecessor with a special Stardust sculpture.

Stardust sculpture

You can also see the Stardust's neon sign over at the Neon Museum.

Stardust sign day
Stardust sign night

The Vegas Golden Knights also paid homage to the casino with their reverse retro jersey this season.

The team said the jerseys embodied the Excalibur and Stardust hotels and were inspired by the old neon hotel signs of the Vegas Strip in the 1990s. The numbers on the back of the jerseys copied the cosmic lettering of the outer-space themed Stardust hotel.