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Businesses across the country take anti-discrimination pledge

Companies take part in the "Open to All" campaign
Posted: 12:47 PM, Aug 02, 2018
Updated: 2018-08-02 19:47:18Z

Businesses across the country that are taking part in the “Open to All” campaign are placing stickers on their store fronts to show customers they are inclusive.

Voodoo Doughnuts in Colorado was one of the first businesses to take part in the initiative, and now, hundreds of others are signing up.

The “Open to All” coalition, which includes over 1,200 businesses, believes no one should have to ever worry about whether they will be denied service.

The campaign was sparked by an incident that happened at a Colorado cake shop back in 2012. The shop refused to bake a wedding cake for a same-sex couple because it didn't align with their religious beliefs. The case went all the way to the Supreme Court, where the ruling was in favor of the cake shop.

Daniel Ramos with One Colorado, a non-profit organization for the LGBTQ community, says that ruling was a turning point.

"We know we have so much work to do to make sure people, regardless of their sexual orientation, regardless of their gender identity, have access to businesses that won't deny them, simply because who they are and who they love,” says Ramos.

Ramos believes the “Open to All” campaign is good for all businesses. 

"Over the past number of years, we have seen businesses stand on the side of equality because they know equality means business,” Ramos says. “It’s good for them, for their companies, for their employees to feel safe, supported and welcome."

A huge contributor for the movement is Yelp. When you open the app, it will tell you if a business is participating. Also, Lyft is another big company taking part.

The coalition, along with One Colorado, believes that taking part in this movement, you are standing up for human rights. 

"Regardless of who you are or who you love, when you walk into a business, you should be served and that you are treated with dignity and respect," Ramos says.