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Tips on how to find good deals on hard-to-find exercise equipment

FDA to re-evaluate definition of 'healthy'
Posted at 3:05 PM, Feb 09, 2021
and last updated 2021-02-09 18:05:58-05

DETROIT, Mich. — Out of stock, marked up, and delayed, are just a few of the complaints we’ve heard about the quest to buy gym equipment.

So where does the shortage now stand and where should you focus your search if you’re looking for the most in-demand equipment.

Putting your body to work with dumbbells and barbells is no easy feat, but it turns out -- even buying them is a heavy lift.

David Millar and his wife Jill hit that roadblock early on in an effort to transform their downstairs space.

The two were desperate to incorporate their cross-fit workout while stuck at home, but for a good while, were unable to get the goods.

“We used Marketplace, Craigslist - went to all the manufacturers,” David says. “Nobody had anything in stock.”

The couple, finally settling after getting antsy about making their home gym feel whole.

But elsewhere in metro Detroit?

“We ordered about 140 kilograms of free weights which have yet to be here,” Kate tells us,

The order is now stuck at the border after a whopping 6-month delay.

“They’re still sitting in customs as we speak,” Kate says.

I’ll be honest, I too had a hard time getting my hands on weights.

To get mine I had to go to an online marketplace and pay $60 over retail, but I was able to avoid a 3-to-4-month delay.

Despite gyms reopening, metro Detroiters are continuing to transition to a home-based workout, with viewers sending us images of their new digs - crafted amidst the pandemic.

The demand has put a big strain on the industry, but it hasn’t been bad for everyone.

Eric Swanson is the owner of the Michigan-based American Home Fitness Company. It’s a company that has seen its transactions triple, prompting an expansion this past fall.

“We tripled our warehousing space, we’re now down in Oak Park in about 24,000 sq. ft.,” he says.

The good news for retail buyers, he says, is that manufacturers are now catching up from some of the major stock shortages seen in the summer.

“Everybody in our industry had to endure some supply chain problems,” Swanson says.

Swanson is happy to report he now has strength training equipment fully in stock.

But if you’re on the hunt, here’s the Rebound Rundown:

  • Amazon and Walmart continue to be some of the largest retailers that remain stocked with free weights.
  • Note that due to freight delays, you could see your shipping date get pushed back.
  • Using a local online marketplace will help you avoid delays but be cautious. heavily vet the seller and the product itself.

And though you may see higher prices on a third-party site, the general range you should expect to pay on weights is around $1.50 to $2 a pound. anything more will depend on how badly you need it.

This story was first published by Ameera David at WXYZ in Detroit, Michigan.