Clark County commissioners to explore pigeon birth control to combat problem

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) - There is a pigeon problem that is getting out of hand and it now has the attention of local politicians.
                
Clark County Commissioners discussed plans Tuesday to combat a growing number of people feeding pigeons.
                
People living near Russell Road and Rainbow Boulevard say they have had a persistent pigeon plague for years.

"You've heard of extreme sports, well this is extreme pigeon feeding, at its finest,” said Teresa Oxborrow, who is dealing with a pigeon poop mess.

Oxborrow and others living nearby are fed up over a neighbor who they say is feeding hundreds of pigeons.

The poop left behind is piling up on roofs, awnings, and patios.
                
“I get flies, it stinks when it rains. It's disgusting," said Oxborrow.
                
Clark County Commissioners said, at the moment, the pigeon problem is up in the air because there is no specific ordinance banning pigeon feeding on private property.

"We have people that think their well-intentioned, and that is absolutely causing a public nuisance,” said Clark County Commissioner Chris Giunchigliani during Tuesday’s meeting.
                
The commission is considering solutions, including a new ordinance addressing the issue of pigeon feeders.
                
Commissioners also considered pigeon birth control to slow the population growth.
                
There was discussion of exploring permanent pigeon sterilization options as well as creating a pigeon snitch hotline where people can rat out pigeon feeders once an ordinance is on the books.

"We need to do something, to help our residents stay healthy. This is a health hazard,” Oxborrow added.

The Southern Nevada Health District says pigeons are extremely bad for people. A well-fed pigeon can produce up to 25 pounds of dropping per year, according to the Health District.

Pigeons are also known to carry a variety of diseases and parasites that can make people very ill.
                
The Clark County Commission directed staff to explore solutions and will revisit the issue.

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