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3 communities now learning same lessons Las Vegas learned after 1 October

Posted at 4:42 AM, Aug 05, 2019
and last updated 2019-08-05 11:25:11-04

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — The Healing Gardens is a place where people like Becky Burnett come to remember.

Burnett came Sunday to remember the lives lost on 1 October when a gunman killed 58 people during the Route 91 Harvest Festival.

She said her daughter was in the crowd that night.

"She had two friends with her," Burnett said, "thank god none of them were hurt."

She said her daughter now lives in Gilroy, California -- blocks from the mass shooting there last Sunday.

Burnett said she and her family are from El Paso, Texas, where a gunman shot and killed 20 people just hours before a different gunman killed nine people in Dayton, Ohio.

"Within hours we have the next one," Burnett said, "you never expect something like this. You never, out of the blue, expect to lose your life."

Those three communities will be learning hard-earned lessons that local law enforcement learned during an 18-month-long investigation into the 1 October shooting.

That investigation produced a 158 page report that Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo presented in July.

"To act on lessons learned," Lombardo said at the July press conference, "to better our agency. To better prepare the community for any future events."

The 1 October After Action Report identified 93 recommendations for area agencies to better respond to active shooter situations including better access to rifles and trauma kits, better communication between agencies, and creation of a more efficient system of identifying and tracking victims.

"I think the process of identifying folks, providing accurate information post-event, is imperative for the public to understand what we're going through," Lombardo said.

Burnett said she hopes recently passed laws that allow officers to confiscate guns from anyone deemed a danger, called Red Flag Laws, can prevent another mass shooting in Nevada.

"It's better to speak up and be wrong than never speak up and have another shooting," Burnett said.