Ping Pang Pong introduces new look, expanded space

Ping Pang Pong celebrated its recent redesign and expansion with a ribbon-cutting ceremony, traditional dragon dance and lunch in its new private banquet room, which can seat 100, last week.

Ping Pang Pong opened 17 years ago in the Gold Coast hotel-casino on West Flamingo Road. Since then, it has won numerous awards on both the local and national levels.

The expanded space can now seat 300 guests, which is an increase of 50 percent.

The "new" restaurant features elaborate dark walnut screenwork and a modern version of a Chinese pergola, juxtaposed with clean modern wood paneling to create a stunning façade. The entry portal is flanked by two authentic foo dog sculptures acquired direct from China.

The reception area showcases a host station designed to resemble a Chinese apothecary cabinet and overhead are a gorgeous array of silk lanterns festooned with red tassels. An impressive tea servery visually anchors the front quarter of the seating area, while at the back, a large framed opening offers a glimpse of the culinary artistry in the bustling kitchen.

Though the space is all-new, the flavors that made Ping Pang Pong famous remain unchanged. 

Dim sum service is available from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily, with classic pushcarts offering a selection of more than 80 authentic dishes from provinces throughout China. Dim sum standards are joined by a rotating selection of seasonal favorites like the Mango Lobster Scallop Roll, combining fresh diced mango, lobster and scallop in crisply fried thin panko tossed rice paper; or the Aromatic Duck Bun, featuring southern Canton five-spice roasted pulled duck with Mandarin cucumber, served in a steamed lotus bun.

From 5 p.m. to 3 a.m., diners can enjoy a selection of authentic dinner entrees, including Smoked Orange Ribeye Cubes, seared over a high-flame wok with peppercorn and toasted garlic; and the Macanese Crustacean Claypot, featuring live-tank seafood served in a ginger laksa curry broth with saffron and chopped herbs.
 

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